To Be a People Person: Top Skills Entrepreneurs Must Have

a female entrepreneur

Wherever you are, whatever you do, you’re in the business of people. You work with them, motivate them, serve them, partner with them, etc.

This is why entrepreneurs need to improve their people skills, especially those who are in cutthroat industries, like the food sector. In this competitive field, it’s the people you forge strong relationships with that keep you afloat.

Here are three people skills you need to improve on to ensure business success.

Communication

Articulate communication, at that. You should be able to talk about your ideas really well. A good assessment is if the people you converse with understand what you say. When you get your employees to work and deliver the results you want to see, it’s a sign that there’s good communication between you and your team.

A great way to achieve excellent communication skills is to just practice talking — and not just to your employees, but to your customers, as well. So, dedicate a time to visit your sandwich store and talk to your patrons.

Listening

Listening is as important as communicating. This refers to active listening, meaning, being invested in the conversation. This is a basic people skill because, essentially, it’s paying respect to the person you’re talking to.

This is crucial when you’re building a new business venture. You want to know as much as you can about a business opportunity, for instance, a sandwich store or a hot dog franchise for sale, so listen carefully.

At the same time, you want to respect and maintain a close relationship with a person pitching a proposal because he or she might just be the person who’ll introduce you to people who can help you in the business.

Empathy

You should be able to understand people’s feelings and share their sentiments. Otherwise, you’ll be known as the cold, heartless businessman no one wants to do business with.

The best way to improve empathy is to set aside your preconceived beliefs and see things from the other’s point of view. When you do this, you’ll discover that your business partner who’s pitching a new food business idea isn’t stubborn or unreasonable. They have a reason to think the way they do.

People skills are a must-have for food entrepreneurs. The bottom line of all this is to treat humans as they are, worthy of respect and dignity.